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Regarding "Bullet Tips" and "Bullet Casings"


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Words don't have intrinsic meaning, they have uses. We are in the process of adding to the meaning of the word bullet.

This isn't the first or last time this tragedy will occur.

 

Am I being a bully? That word used to mean lover.

Am I being nice? That word used to mean ignorant.

 

Relax, it's not worth a mod. Have an ice cream instead.

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Interesting, i never thought about this, even if i know the difference. In english imho it's often called "bullet" if not in general named "ammunition".

 

Thinking about it, in german i never name it bullet (Geschoss) nor cartridge (Patrone)... so in my mother language i'd never say literally translated "i'm out of bullets".... i always say "i'm out of ammunition" (and i'd also never say "i'm out of cartridges"). However, in english "i'm out of bullets" sounds acceptable for me... Is this commonly mixed up this way in english?

 

In german if talking about amount of ammunition we also say "Schuß"... don't know if there is a specific translation but in general "Ich habe 20 Schuß" means "i can shot my weapon 20 times". That is independent of a weapon using cartridges or bullets (like the blunderbuss).

Probably that is "rounds"? I have 20 rounds left?

Edited by Liesel Weppen (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Liesel Weppen said:

Interesting, i never thought about this, even if i know the difference. In english imho it's often called "bullet" if not in general named "ammunition".

 

Thinking about it, in german i never name it bullet (Geschoss) nor cartridge (Patrone)... so in my mother language i'd never say literally translated "i'm out of bullets".... i always say "i'm out of ammunition" (and i'd also never say "i'm out of cartridges"). However, in english "i'm out of bullets" sounds acceptable for me... Is this commonly mixed up this way in english?

 

In german if talking about amount of ammunition we also say "Schuß"... don't know if there is a specific translation but in general "Ich habe 20 Schuß" means "i can shot my weapon 20 times". That is independent of a weapon using cartridges or bullets (like the blunderbuss).

Probably that is "rounds"? I have 20 rounds left?

But it also common in German to say the equivalent of "bullet" ("Ich habe nur noch eine Kugel im Revolver") for smaller amounts of ammunition, while ammunition itself is often used when talking about it generally or for huge amounts. 

Edited by meganoth (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, meganoth said:

But it also common in German to say the equivalent of "bullet" ("Ich habe nur noch eine Kugel im Revolver") for smaller amounts of ammunition, while ammunition itself is often used when talking about it generally or for huge amounts. 

Hmm, i'm not sure if i'd say it that way. That's where i'd use "Schuß".

However it is technically correct, because there is only one bullet in your revolver.... practically doesn't matter if the cartridge is still attached to the bullet.

But if you ask someone to give you a bullet, it makes no sense if he hands you just a bullet. You need the whole cartridge including the bullet. ;)

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54 minutes ago, Liesel Weppen said:

Hmm, i'm not sure if i'd say it that way. That's where i'd use "Schuß".

However it is technically correct, because there is only one bullet in your revolver.... practically doesn't matter if the cartridge is still attached to the bullet.

But if you ask someone to give you a bullet, it makes no sense if he hands you just a bullet. You need the whole cartridge including the bullet. ;)

What are the chances that he makes the effort to remove the bullet from the cartridge so he can give you just a bullet ? 😉

 

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2 minutes ago, Gazz said:

That depends on how well the person likes you.

In those cases I tend to not ask the person for anything except possibly to keep a lot of distance between us.

 

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5 hours ago, meganoth said:

What are the chances that he makes the effort to remove the bullet from the cartridge so he can give you just a bullet ?

 

Well, I mean, we presume that he has a bullet-removal-and-delivery tool right there with him, no? Granted, the requested item may arrive more rapidly than desired...

 

12 hours ago, Beelzybub said:

Words don't have intrinsic meaning, they have uses.

 

I swear if I hear the coroner say, over my dead body, "well the scars beg the question: was he in a fight?" I WILL ZOMBIE MY ASS OFF THE TABLE AND CHOKE HIM OUT. The phrases "different than" and "better then" will get at least a dead eye twitch which scares the f*** out of him.

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  • 2 months later...
On 3/8/2021 at 10:14 PM, Beelzybub said:

Words don't have intrinsic meaning, they have uses. We are in the process of adding to the meaning of the word bullet.

This isn't the first or last time this tragedy will occur.

 

Am I being a bully? That word used to mean lover.

Am I being nice? That word used to mean ignorant.

 

Relax, it's not worth a mod. Have an ice cream instead.

 

If words don't have intrinsic meaning then what would you do if I asked you to "Revoscuttle" the "Flumacher" ...could you achieve the requested task without asking what those words mean?

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1 hour ago, Sigil_Thane said:

 

If words don't have intrinsic meaning then what would you do if I asked you to "Revoscuttle" the "Flumacher" ...could you achieve the requested task without asking what those words mean?

If we were to agree on a meaning for them, then yes, I would know what you were asking. We humans assign meaning to words, they do not have intrinsic meaning.

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Yeah yeah... old American joke about giving new names to existing objects with existing naming just because they don't like books))) 

We also never say "I ran out of bullets", but we do say "Save the last bullet for yourself".

And yes lets play this nice grammar nazi game)) You can commence the execution!

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Someone in my management chain used "decisioning" in a talk the other day (meaning "to make decisions").  Use it in a sentence? Sure, I can probably do that without vomiting: "We want to accelerate software development to ensure better decisioning by business users."

 

(Yes, TFP forum text box, that word does deserve the red squiggle underline.)

 

It got worse. He later used *urp* the neologism *hork*...man I don't know if I can type this...*deep breath*..."Peopleing"

 

Pronounced "people-ing". It apparently means "working with/around other people". The sentence was something like "I am very outgoing, but after about one or two hours of peopleing, Corey is done and needs some working alone time." I have no idea why that last bit wasn't just "aloneing" I mean might as well complete the set.

 

Info Tech is just the worst at creating stupid buzzwords.

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18 hours ago, Boidster said:

Someone in my management chain used "decisioning" in a talk the other day (meaning "to make decisions").  Use it in a sentence? Sure, I can probably do that without vomiting: "We want to accelerate software development to ensure better decisioning by business users."

 

(Yes, TFP forum text box, that word does deserve the red squiggle underline.)

 

It got worse. He later used *urp* the neologism *hork*...man I don't know if I can type this...*deep breath*..."Peopleing"

 

Pronounced "people-ing". It apparently means "working with/around other people". The sentence was something like "I am very outgoing, but after about one or two hours of peopleing, Corey is done and needs some working alone time." I have no idea why that last bit wasn't just "aloneing" I mean might as well complete the set.

 

Info Tech is just the worst at creating stupid buzzwords.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Try living with an autistic comparative philologist.  Did you know that decadent means rotting or putrid?  Yeah me either, but my lovely husband prevented me from extreme embarrassment when marketing my desserts with that word...

 

I was also confused about the bullet tip / casing thingy but you know, they kill zombies pretty good no matter what you call them.

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