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meganoth

meganoth

7 hours ago, hiemfire said:

Your example is one that if you keep trying against the same target you'll succeed and you have the opportunity to improve your chances by improving your gear. With auto-aggro volumes no matter how many times you try to stealth through them you fail, and it happens regardless of perk investment or equipment.

Shooting = rng within a confined area (the "circle" as you outlined, though it is off set low and left of what the crosshairs indicate for those curious).

Auto-aggro volumes = "@%$# you, your perk investment doesn't matter." switch with no forewarning (something that I think you keep missing is part of the problem, there is no indication that a volume being entered is an auto-aggro volume).

The closest thing your example could ever achieve to an auto-aggro volume would be if there was a random chance that the player character's gun would blowup on them whenever they pulled the trigger, and even then having a backup weapon of the exact same type and some painkillers would still get around it. Auto-aggro volumes have no stealth based workaround and teach "blind" (as I defined previously) players that stealth cannot be relied on and, coupled with the similar effectiveness of perked vs unperked stealth, any points invested into FTS are wasted.

Players who try and play stealthy are punished for it by auto-aggro volumes. Those who don't depend on stealth very likely don't even notice the difference when an entire volume activates due to it being an auto-aggro volume.

Details. You have an effect and if you notice when and how it happens you can get an idea why. In the case of shooting you might notice that you hit more often with guns with a small circle. Players with RPG experience have an easier time making the connection. In the case of auto-aggro you might notice that it mostly happens in loot rooms, like it is a staged encounter. Players of games with boss encounters and also many RPGs might remember scripted encounters in other games.

 

I'm not saying this design is fine by the way and I think pApA^LeGBa idea of a siren or alarm lamp going off is an excellent idea. Doesn't even need a to have a lamp or siren visible somewhere, just a siren sound or the room tinted with a blinking red light coming from some opening would be great.

 

meganoth

meganoth

7 hours ago, hiemfire said:

Your example is one that if you keep trying against the same target you'll succeed and you have the opportunity to improve your chances by improving your gear. With auto-aggro volumes no matter how many times you try to stealth through them you fail, and it happens regardless of perk investment or equipment.

Shooting = rng within a confined area (the "circle" as you outlined, though it is off set low and left of what the crosshairs indicate for those curious).

Auto-aggro volumes = "@%$# you, your perk investment doesn't matter." switch with no forewarning (something that I think you keep missing is part of the problem, there is no indication that a volume being entered is an auto-aggro volume).

The closest thing your example could ever achieve to an auto-aggro volume would be if there was a random chance that the player character's gun would blowup on them whenever they pulled the trigger, and even then having a backup weapon of the exact same type and some painkillers would still get around it. Auto-aggro volumes have no stealth based workaround and teach "blind" (as I defined previously) players that stealth cannot be relied on and, coupled with the similar effectiveness of perked vs unperked stealth, any points invested into FTS are wasted.

Players who try and play stealthy are punished for it by auto-aggro volumes. Those who don't depend on stealth very likely don't even notice the difference when an entire volume activates due to it being an auto-aggro volume.

Details. You have an effect and if you notice when and how it happens you can get an idea why. In the case of shooting you might notice that you hit more often with guns with a small circle. Players with RPG experience have an easier time making the connection. In the case of auto-aggro you might notice that it mostly happens in loot rooms, like it is a staged encounter. Players of games with boss encounters and also many RPGs might remember scripted encounters in other games.

 

I'm not saying this design is fine by the way and I think pApA^LeGBa idea of a siren or alarm lamp going off is an excellent idea. Doesn't even need a to have a lamp or siren visible somewhere, just a siren sound or the room tinted with a blinking red light would be great

 

meganoth

meganoth

7 hours ago, hiemfire said:

Your example is one that if you keep trying against the same target you'll succeed and you have the opportunity to improve your chances by improving your gear. With auto-aggro volumes no matter how many times you try to stealth through them you fail, and it happens regardless of perk investment or equipment.

Shooting = rng within a confined area (the "circle" as you outlined, though it is off set low and left of what the crosshairs indicate for those curious).

Auto-aggro volumes = "@%$# you, your perk investment doesn't matter." switch with no forewarning (something that I think you keep missing is part of the problem, there is no indication that a volume being entered is an auto-aggro volume).

The closest thing your example could ever achieve to an auto-aggro volume would be if there was a random chance that the player character's gun would blowup on them whenever they pulled the trigger, and even then having a backup weapon of the exact same type and some painkillers would still get around it. Auto-aggro volumes have no stealth based workaround and teach "blind" (as I defined previously) players that stealth cannot be relied on and, coupled with the similar effectiveness of perked vs unperked stealth, any points invested into FTS are wasted.

Players who try and play stealthy are punished for it by auto-aggro volumes. Those who don't depend on stealth very likely don't even notice the difference when an entire volume activates due to it being an auto-aggro volume.

Details. You have an effect and if you notice when and how it happens you can get an idea why. In the case of shooting you might notice that you hit more often with guns with a small circle. Players with RPG experience have an easier time making the connection. In the case of auto-aggro you might notice that it mostly happens in loot rooms, like it is a staged encounter. Players of games with boss encounters and also many RPGs might remember scripted encounters in other games.

 

I'm not saying this design is fine by the way and I think pApA^LeGBa idea of a siren or alarm lamp going of is an excellent idea.

 

meganoth

meganoth

7 hours ago, hiemfire said:

Your example is one that if you keep trying against the same target you'll succeed and you have the opportunity to improve your chances by improving your gear. With auto-aggro volumes no matter how many times you try to stealth through them you fail, and it happens regardless of perk investment or equipment.

Shooting = rng within a confined area (the "circle" as you outlined, though it is off set low and left of what the crosshairs indicate for those curious).

Auto-aggro volumes = "@%$# you, your perk investment doesn't matter." switch with no forewarning (something that I think you keep missing is part of the problem, there is no indication that a volume being entered is an auto-aggro volume).

The closest thing your example could ever achieve to an auto-aggro volume would be if there was a random chance that the player character's gun would blowup on them whenever they pulled the trigger, and even then having a backup weapon of the exact same type and some painkillers would still get around it. Auto-aggro volumes have no stealth based workaround and teach "blind" (as I defined previously) players that stealth cannot be relied on and, coupled with the similar effectiveness of perked vs unperked stealth, any points invested into FTS are wasted.

Players who try and play stealthy are punished for it by auto-aggro volumes. Those who don't depend on stealth very likely don't even notice the difference when an entire volume activates due to it being an auto-aggro volume.

Details. You have an effect and if you notice when and how it happens you can get an idea why. In the case of shooting you might notice that you hit more often with guns with a small circle. Players with RPG experience have an easier time making the connection. In the case of auto-aggro you might notice that it mostly happens in loot rooms, like it is a staged encounter. Players of games with boss encounters and also many RPGs might remember scripted encounters in other games.

 

I'm not saying this design is fine and I think pApA^LeGBa idea of a siren or alarm lamp going of is by far the best idea this thread has brought up.

 

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